quantumaniac:

Nobel Prize in Physics 2014 Awarded for Work on LED Lights

This year’s Nobel Laureates are rewarded for having invented a new energy-efficient and environment-friendly light source – the blue light-emitting diode (LED). In the spirit of Alfred Nobel the Prize rewards an invention of greatest benefit to mankind; using blue LEDs, white light can be created in a new way. With the advent of LED lamps we now have more long-lasting and more efficient alternatives to older light sources.
When Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura produced bright blue light beams from their semi-conductors in the early 1990s, they triggered a fundamental transformation of lighting technology. Red and green diodes had been around for a long time but without blue light, white lamps could not be created. Despite considerable efforts, both in the scientific community and in industry, the blue LED had remained a challenge for three decades.
They succeeded where everyone else had failed. Akasaki worked together with Amano at the University of Nagoya, while Nakamura was employed at Nichia Chemicals, a small company in Tokushima. Their inventions were revolutionary. Incandescent light bulbs lit the 20th century; the 21st century will be lit by LED lamps.
White LED lamps emit a bright white light, are long-lasting and energy-efficient. They are constantly improved, getting more efficient with higher luminous flux (measured in lumen) per unit electrical input power (measured in watt). The most recent record is just over 300 lm/W, which can be compared to 16 for regular light bulbs and close to 70 for fluorescent lamps. As about one fourth of world electricity consumption is used for lighting purposes, the LEDs contribute to saving the Earth’s resources. Materials consumption is also diminished as LEDs last up to 100,000 hours, compared to 1,000 for incandescent bulbs and 10,000 hours for fluorescent lights.
The LED lamp holds great promise for increasing the quality of life for over 1.5 billion people around the world who lack access to electricity grids: due to low power requirements it can be powered by cheap local solar power.
The invention of the blue LED is just twenty years old, but it has already contributed to create white light in an entirely new manner to the benefit of us all.

Source: The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
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quantumaniac:

Nobel Prize in Physics 2014 Awarded for Work on LED Lights

This year’s Nobel Laureates are rewarded for having invented a new energy-efficient and environment-friendly light source – the blue light-emitting diode (LED). In the spirit of Alfred Nobel the Prize rewards an invention of greatest benefit to mankind; using blue LEDs, white light can be created in a new way. With the advent of LED lamps we now have more long-lasting and more efficient alternatives to older light sources.

When Isamu AkasakiHiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura produced bright blue light beams from their semi-conductors in the early 1990s, they triggered a fundamental transformation of lighting technology. Red and green diodes had been around for a long time but without blue light, white lamps could not be created. Despite considerable efforts, both in the scientific community and in industry, the blue LED had remained a challenge for three decades.

They succeeded where everyone else had failed. Akasaki worked together with Amano at the University of Nagoya, while Nakamura was employed at Nichia Chemicals, a small company in Tokushima. Their inventions were revolutionary. Incandescent light bulbs lit the 20th century; the 21st century will be lit by LED lamps.

White LED lamps emit a bright white light, are long-lasting and energy-efficient. They are constantly improved, getting more efficient with higher luminous flux (measured in lumen) per unit electrical input power (measured in watt). The most recent record is just over 300 lm/W, which can be compared to 16 for regular light bulbs and close to 70 for fluorescent lamps. As about one fourth of world electricity consumption is used for lighting purposes, the LEDs contribute to saving the Earth’s resources. Materials consumption is also diminished as LEDs last up to 100,000 hours, compared to 1,000 for incandescent bulbs and 10,000 hours for fluorescent lights.

The LED lamp holds great promise for increasing the quality of life for over 1.5 billion people around the world who lack access to electricity grids: due to low power requirements it can be powered by cheap local solar power.

The invention of the blue LED is just twenty years old, but it has already contributed to create white light in an entirely new manner to the benefit of us all.

Source: The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

Follow Quantumaniac on Twitter

(via engineeringisawesome)

599 notes

txchnologist:

Cloaking System Could Make Blind Spots, Surgeons’ Hands Disappear

Scientists investigating the principles of how light behaves have developed a simple way to make objects disappear right before your eyes. It’s not magic; it’s optics.

University of Rochester researchers have used a set of lenses to manipulate focal lengths and create a region that is invisible when peering through the looking glass. They set up four lenses in a way that maintains cloaking in the region even when viewed from several degrees off of straight on.

The team says their system is the first to offer flexibility in viewing angles with a simple, inexpensive design.

Read More

(via chelonaut)

336 notes

queenidinamenzel:

diddlemydiddlies:

aaronthespiritbear:

Golf ball hitting steel at 150mph, recorded at 70 000fps

physics is so fucked up

SCIENCE IS SO METAL

queenidinamenzel:

diddlemydiddlies:

aaronthespiritbear:

Golf ball hitting steel at 150mph, recorded at 70 000fps

physics is so fucked up

SCIENCE IS SO METAL

(Source: azzatron4000, via moosicals)

336,988 notes

afro-dominicano:

The Cycle of Stars — The End

afro-dominicano:

The Cycle of Stars — The End

(via likeaphysicist)

2,133 notes

science-and-things:

hlaar:

So I’ve heard somebody wanted to see a gif of that moment when Brian Cox was ran over by Stephen Hawking. Here it is, I hope it loads.

This gif changed my life

science-and-things:

hlaar:

So I’ve heard somebody wanted to see a gif of that moment when Brian Cox was ran over by Stephen Hawking. Here it is, I hope it loads.

This gif changed my life

(via carlsagan)

32,421 notes

bluedogeyes:

The Higgs Boson Re-Explained (via PHD Comics)

(via likeaphysicist)

2,907 notes

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Sloshing is a problem with which anyone who has carried an overly full cup is familiar. Because of their freedom to flow and conform to any shape, fluids can shift their shape and center of mass drastically when transported. The issue can be especially pronounced in a partially-filled tank. The sloshing of water in a tank on a pick-up truck, for example, can be enough to rock the entire vehicle. One way to deal with sloshing is actively-controlled vibration damping - in other words, making small movements in response to the sloshing to keep the amplitude small. This is exactly the kind of compensation we do when carrying a mug of coffee without spilling. (Image credit: Bosch Rexroth; source)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Sloshing is a problem with which anyone who has carried an overly full cup is familiar. Because of their freedom to flow and conform to any shape, fluids can shift their shape and center of mass drastically when transported. The issue can be especially pronounced in a partially-filled tank. The sloshing of water in a tank on a pick-up truck, for example, can be enough to rock the entire vehicle. One way to deal with sloshing is actively-controlled vibration damping - in other words, making small movements in response to the sloshing to keep the amplitude small. This is exactly the kind of compensation we do when carrying a mug of coffee without spilling. (Image credit: Bosch Rexroth; source)

(via quantumaniac)

973 notes

sci-universe:

There are five special points where a small mass can orbit in a constant pattern with two larger masses (such as a satellite with respect to the Earth and Moon). The Lagrange Points, named in honor of Italian-French mathematician Joseph-Louis Lagrange, are positions where the gravitational pull of two large masses precisely equals the centripetal force required for a small object to move with them. This mathematical problem, known as the “General Three-Body Problem” was considered by Lagrange in his prize winning paper (Essai sur le Problème des Trois Corps, 1772).

The five Sun–Earth Lagrangian points are called SEL1–SEL5, and similarly those of the Earth–Moon system EML1–EML5, etc. Orbits around Lagrangian points offer unique advantages that have made them a good choice for performing certain spacecraft missions.
For example the Sun–Earth L1 point is useful for observations of the Sun, as the Sun is always visible without obstructions by the Earth or the Moon. SOHO, the ESA/NASA solar spacecraft is positioned there.

read descriptions about invidual L-points here

501 notes

itsmichaeldoan:

Miley just broke the laws of physics.

itsmichaeldoan:

Miley just broke the laws of physics.

(Source: 4GIFs.com, via thebroadwaymoviediva)

228,448 notes

ucresearch:

How to float a ping pong ball in mid-air

Dianna “Physics Girl” Cowern, physicist at UC San Diego’s Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, explains in this video how The Coandă Effect can make a ping pong ball float in mid-air.

Read more about Diana Cowern and her quest to encourage girls to pursue science.

(via chelonaut)

1,065 notes