zerostatereflex:

Nice! Some guys are trying to fund this badass phenomenon of physics so we can all enjoy it. :D

"FLUX is based on a complex, thus rarely known law of physics, a phenomenon called Lenz’s law, which can defy our most commonly experienced physical law, gravity itself. It’s actually nothing new. Heinrich Lenz discovered it in the 1830s, we call it Lenz’s law to honor his discovery ever since."

"Every time the magnetic field changes inside a conducting material, it induces a voltage called electromotive force. Depending on the resistance of the material, it creates a current which behaves just like in traditional electromagnets: produces an additional magnetic field. Lenz’s law states that the magnetic field created by this induced current is so directed as to oppose the change in the source flux. To put it more simply, if you create a changing magnetic field by moving a magnet, it will produce a mechanical force trying to slow down the motion. The faster you move, the stronger the force gets. Every time."

Fund it here if you’re feeling this magical ish,..

FEEL FLUX.

(via thepoemthatdoesntrhyme)

1,177 notes

(Source: astrodidact, via bloodredorion)

654 notes

excellent riddle on buoyancy by veritaseum 

0 notes

(Source: officialsamwinchester, via the-krusty-crew)

142,984 notes

zerostatereflex:

Pyro Board: 2D Rubens Tube.

"The pressure variations due to the sound waves affect the flow rate of flammable gas from the holes in the Pyro Board and therefore affect the height and colour of flames. This is interesting for visualizing standing wave patterns and simply awesome to watch when put to music."

Skip to 3:38 in the youtube clip to hear it with the music. The lo-fi track used to demonstrate is sick, and makes it that much more amazing to watch.

DELICIOUS FIRE SOUND WAVES HERE.

(via physicistsneedlovetoo)

739 notes

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Veritasium’s new video has an awesome demonstration featuring acoustics, standing waves, and combustion. It’s a two-dimensional take on the classic Rubens’ tube concept in which flammable gas is introduced into a chamber with a series of holes drilled across the top. Igniting the gas produces an array of flames, which is not especially interesting in itself, until a sound is added. When a note is played in the tube, the gas inside vibrates and, with the right geometry and frequency, can resonate, forming standing waves. The motion of the gas and the shape of the acoustic waves is visible in the flames. Extended into two-dimensions, this creates some very cool effects. (Video credit: Veritasium; via Ryan A.; submitted by jshoer)

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jtotheizzoe:

boop.
This man.

walter lewin did something like that too

jtotheizzoe:

boop.

This man.

walter lewin did something like that too

117,908 notes

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

NPR’s Skunk Bear Tumblr has a great new video on the schlieren visualization technique. The schlieren optical set-up is relatively simple but very powerful, as shown in the video. The technique is sensitive to variations in the refractive index of air; this bends light passing through the test area so that changes in fluid density appear as light and dark regions in the final image. Since air’s density changes with temperature and with compressibility, the technique gets used extensively to visualize buoyancy-driven flows and supersonic flows. Since sound waves are compression waves which change the air’s density as they travel, schlieren can capture them, too. (Video credit: A. Cole/NPR’s Skunk Bear)

604 notes

jtotheizzoe:

skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.

Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.

I’m totally Schlieren right now. Amazing sights of sounds.

9,238 notes

christinetheastrophysicist:

Want to know which elementary particle best describes you? Well this interactive quiz by the DESY research centre and Universum Bremen will show you based on how you see yourself.
* My top 3 particles were the gluon, tau neutrino, and up quark.

christinetheastrophysicist:

Want to know which elementary particle best describes you? Well this interactive quiz by the DESY research centre and Universum Bremen will show you based on how you see yourself.

* My top 3 particles were the gluon, tau neutrino, and up quark.

240 notes